COVID Test Tips For Kids

COVID Test Tips For Kids

Are you getting your children covid tested? Here are some tips to make the process easier.

Get Prepared

Sometimes parents tend to avoid telling their children ahead of time that they going to have a medical procedure since they think it is going to make the kids nervous. This instinct is normal but it might not be the best call to make. View it as being the critical play in a game without a game plan or no practice. Good preparation will enhance the feeling of control and reduce anxiety.

Before you go, discuss the following points with your child:

What test you are taking. Tell your child something like, “it is a fairly quick test that will you whether you have the virus or not.”

Why is it needed? They are also going to want to know why they need to do it: “It is important to find out whether or not you have the virus to determine how to keep you healthy and best care for you.”

What will occur during the test? Guide them through the process and avoid surprises. You can tell them something like, ‘They will place a swab, similar to a Q-tip, fairly far up your nose and then it around for 15 to 30 seconds, or about the same amount of time it takes to sing the song Happy Birthday.

Where the test is taking place. Depending on your specific situation that could be your car or a medical clinic. There has been a notable increase in faked tests – click to learn more.

What the providers will look like. Tell them that most likely the providers will be wearing face shields or face masks. For kids, they can be scary when they are used to doctors and nurses having smiling faces. You may want to show them photos of what providers may look like and discuss why the equipment is being worn. You can tell them, “That is how they ensure you don’t share any germs with them and they don’t share any with you.’

Find a Position That is Comfortable for your Child

Comfort positioning refers to a way to hold your child throughout a medical procedure that will keep them feeling comforted and safe. All pediatric medical organizations recommend them. That is in contrast to holding a child down to perform a procedure. It is been shown by years of research that is a very bad idea and your child can be traumatized by it.

The best option for nasal swabs is for your child to sit on your lap, with his or her back to your chest. That will allow you to hug them so their hands and arms are key from their face, and reassure them with soothing words and a calm physical presence. This is a good strategy for older children as well. You can position them in between your legs. No one is ever too old to receive comfort from people they trust and love.

If your child is being tested at a drive-thru testing site, go to the back of your car to be with them.

If your child is being tested at a drive-thru testing site, go to the back of your car to be with them.

Practice Staying Still

In order for a nasal swab to be done as comfortably as possible, it is necessary to remain still. For kids, that can be challenging, especially in a situation that is unfamiliar and uncomfortable. A good strategy is to tell your kid to imagine they are a statue. You turn practicing this into a game: “what can stay like a statue for the longest amount of time?”

Change The Focus

All parents know what it feels like struggling to get the attention of their child when they are completely absorbed in a movie or TV show. The natural ability to be able to turn the world out and focus is very useful in terms of changing how distress and pain are experienced by humans. Ask your child to focus on something else, like a special toy, favorite music, or a video. This strategy should be used before they have the nasal swab done to keep anxiety under control before and during the nasal swab procedure to make it go easier and faster.  

Ask Them To Use Their Other Senses

When your kid’s other senses are engaged it can change the way they feel. Hugging a favorite stuffed animal, a hand or forehead massage, or listening to music can all help them focus less on their discomfort.

Write Your Plan Down and Then Practice It

Surprising this can make a significant impact. keep in mind that choice reduces stress and makes people feel powerful. Allow your children to choose the strategies they would like to use. If your entire family is getting tested at once, allow them to choose who will go first. Parents can model good coping and calm. In this situation, it can also be a good idea to include a reward. A little motivation can help us get through a challenge. Make sure they have something to look forward to after their swab test.

Particularly for younger children, using play to practice the nasal can help them better understand what will occur and how they would like to cope with it. Similar to practicing for the dance recital or big game, practicing helps to reduce anxiety and build confidence. They can practice on a favorite stuffed animal, on you, or whatever else they would like to use.

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