Safety tips Posts

Garage Door Safety Tips for your Family

Your garage door is the largest entry into your home. It’s also the biggest heaviest door in your home. That’s why it’s imperative to learn a few safety tips that you can teach your family. Read on to learn to help keep your garage door safe.

Garage Door Safety Tips

Your Garage Door Isn’t a Toy

Your garage door isn’t a toy and shouldn’t be used for entertainment purposes. Never allow your children to use it as a toy and never allow them to use it as a ride. That’s not only a bad idea, it can be fatal. Teach your children to keep their distance from the garage door.

Don’t Delay on Garage Door Repairs

If you notice that anything at all is wrong with your garage door you need to get it repaired immediately, if not sooner. That’s why you should always have the number of your local garage door repair services handy. A damaged garage door will only get worse if left neglected. That’s because, when it comes to garage doors, small problems only lead to bigger problems if not taken care of properly and in a timely manner. Think of it this way, your garage door has lots of working parts, much like a car. You wouldn’t think of not taking care of car repairs, so do the same for your garage door.

Don’t Share Your Password

Never share the password for your garage door opener. It can easily end up the wrong hands. If you have a modern garage door opener you can set a one time password or you can open your garage door with an app on your cell phone.

Keep Your Fingers Off

Your garage door can easily injure your hands or the hands of your children. Teach your children not to put their fingers between your garage door panels. That’s because garage door panels can seriously harm your children’s hands and fingers. Your policy should be that only parents can touch the garage door.

This guest post was written by  Hazel at:

Customer’s Choice Garage Doors and Openers, Inc

2807 Okeechobee Rd, Fort Pierce, FL 34947

(772) 242-5464

Food Safety Tips for Children

Everyone is at risk of getting food poisoning. However, babies and toddlers have a higher risk and once young children get food poisoning, they have a hard time getting well. You can always avoid food poisoning with the following simple steps.

Food Safety Tips for Children

Preparing And Handling Food Safely

Young children are vulnerable to food poisoning because they don’t have strong immune systems to fight any foodborne infections. According to CDC, children under 3 years of age have a higher rate of hospitalization than those above 3 years of age. That’s why you need to prepare and handle food safely when feeding younger children.

 

When feeding young children, you need to avoid the following:

 

  • Unpasteurized dairy products such as milk or cheese
  • Foods that contain raw eggs or partially cooked or raw eggs
  • Undercooked or raw poultry or meat
  • Undercooked or raw shellfish or fish
  • Raw sprouts
  • Unpasteurized juices

 

Other foods you should avoid giving your child include the following:

 

  • Honey – Give it your child after they turn 1. It contains spores of toxic bacterium that causes botulism, a very sever foodborne illness. The bacterium is often found in soil and children under the age of 1 can’t process it properly.

You should also avoid feeding babies their food right from the jar. Double dipping introduces bacteria from the child’s mouth into the food through the spoon. The bacteria might grow in the leftovers causing food poisoning. Rather, it’s advisable to remove the food from the jar and place it in a feeding dish and feed your child from it. Any jars of baby food that haven’t come into contact with the baby’s saliva should be capped and refrigerated under 40 degrees F or below.

 

Additionally, you should save:

  • Any opened strained fruits for 2 or 3 days
  • Strained meats for 1 day
  • Meat and vegetable combinations for 2 days

Note that, unopened jars of baby food have the same shelf-life as other types of canned food.

 

Choking Hazards

Food Safety Tips for Children

Pre-schoolers, toddlers and babies have a very high risk of choking. That’s because their teeth are not strong enough to chew tough food into smaller and digestible particles. To prevent your child from choking, you should avoid giving children under 4 years of age the following:

 

  • Small Hard Foods – Popcorn, nuts, dry flake cereal, pretzels, seeds, chips, raw peas, raw carrots, raw peeled apples, raw carrots, cherries with pits, cherry tomatoes, pear slices and whole kernel corn. Break these foods into smaller pieces for toddlers rather than giving them whole pieces.

 

  • Slippery Foods – Poultry, large pieces of meats, grapes, cough drops or lollipops. You should chop meat, grapes, poultry or any other food into smaller pieces.

 

  • Sticky Foods – Such as gum, marshmallows, peanut butter, jelly beans, taffy, gummy candies, fruit leathers or peanut butter.

 

You should always practice safety at all times when feeding your children. You should give toddlers finger foods such as cheese, bagels, banana pieces or graham crackers strips. You should always watch young children when they are eating. You should force your children to sit down when drinking or eating rather than running, lying down or walking. Encourage your children to take their time and chew their food properly. You should always look for warning labels on all foods, especially those with high choking risks. You should be prepared to provide first aid whenever your child is choking.

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